Most new parents feel that their pediatrician knows everything there is to know about babies and children. Well they should, in medical and health issues. And parents should get their pediatrician’s or a health professional’s advise on those areas.

However, it’s not a well known fact but pediatricians get VERY little training on child sleep. They are under-skilled and under-equipped to give you any specific advise other than telling you that they need to sleep this much, nap how many times, and that’s it usually.

I’m not putting them down here. I LOVE and respect all my kids’ pediatricians and without them, my kids won’t be as healthy and taken care of so well when they were sick.

I’m merely pointing out the fact that they’re not the best people to ask for baby sleep advice.

Case in point: I had a pediatrician who emailed me and reached out where she could get more training.

In her own words, “I am seeing mostly community Paediatric cases and realized that I am under-equipped in handling sleep problems in children. I have attended some short courses pertaining to this aspect and find that I need more training.”

I shared with her some resources and where she could get more in-depth training. I see this doctor as someone who is passionate about her job and she wants to be more skilled so that she can help even more cases around sleep. I totally respect that. Bless her!

Nurturing leaders, as I what I call parents who make conscious decisions around their baby’s health and emotional wellbeing, would seek out experts to solve their parenting issues.

I created Rhythm of Sleep, a gentle sleep process that doesn’t require the cry-it-out sleep training to overcome your baby or toddler’s sleep issues. More connection + more heart + reduced crying.

Based on your child’s natural circadian rhythm, and understanding how young children’s emotions work, I combine them both to bring you the sleep quality that you dream of.

I want to share with you a case study of one of the families I worked with recently. Her baby was 7 months old when we started. She was waking up every hour in the night crying out loud and needed to be carried to sleep. She was also taking incomplete naps at 30-45 minutes at one time and unpredictable from one day to another.

We put together a sleep plan and mom started the plan by reinstating a sleep hygiene for her baby. A regular wake up time in the morning, watching out for her window of wakefulness in between naps and regular bedtime that was supporting her natural circadian rhythm.

Most babies, I would say 90%, have an early wake up time between 6-730am. Therefore, we need to ensure that they go to sleep by 7-8pm to meet that sleep requirement. Naps are also crucial to ensure that bedtime happens smoothly with minimal night wakings.

Next we worked on weaning off being carried to sleep.

The one thing that mom was worried about was how her baby was not doing 11 hours at night no matter how much we tweaked the nap timings and bedtime. After a while, I called it that she’s just on the lower end of her sleep needs. And she was happy throughout the day with that amount of sleep she’s getting (around 10.5 hours)

At the end of the time we worked together, her baby slept through the night and naps were predictable.

Mom was very happy, very grateful and she seemed much more relaxed and confident around sleep. Her relationship with her husband improved as a result, and she could spend quality uninterrupted time with her oldest daughter after her baby has gone to sleep.

Rhythm of Sleep works and it works very well when I show up 100% for the client and the client shows up 100% to do their work.

I’m confident that I can help you too if you’re willing.

I’m putting together a brand new free mini course on Rhythm of Sleep via a pop up Facebook group, so that I can help more families in ways your pediatrician can’t.

If you’d like to be on the waiting list and be the first to get notified when the Facebook group is open, click here to enter your details and get more info.